Tag Archives: Photos

Sunday at the CityGrid Hackathon Los Angeles

Some pics from Sunday at the CityGrid Hackathon, Los Angeles at Coloft.

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Location Photos from Foursquare, Instagram and Flickr

I was playing around with the Instagram API yesterday to see how many of the images on the popular photo sharing platform actually had geo coordinates associated with the pictures.

It was about 50%, and I will definitely be using more in local sites I’m building.

This morning CityGrid Publisher, Explore.to pointed out their innovative usage of photos from multiple sources.

On their places detail pages, Explore.to doesn’t just use the default images for a place, they also pull in geo tagged photos from Foursquare, Instagram and Flickr.

Explore.to is a great example of the power of APIs, and mashing up geo content from multiple sources to make your places search and detail pages much richer and localized by the people who actually have been to these places.

Fifty Percent of Instagram Photos Have Geo Coordinates

I’m playing around with the Instagram API, to determine if it is a good source for pulling location specific, high quality photos.

Many of the photos I come across, that associated with locations…well, just suck. I love using Instagram and feel i take some really cool photos from specific locations. So I wanted to test the waters.

I wrote a script that pulled 500 images across 20 of my Instagram friends. I figured that was a good cross-section. Here are the results:

  • Number of Photos – 500
  • Number with Latitude / Longitude – 261
  • Number with No Location – 239

That is slightly over 50% of Instagram photos having latitude and longitude associated with each photo. Awesome!

After evaluating my own photos, and talking to a couple of my friends, we concluded that the ones without location info, are probably from taking photos with our camera outside of Instagram, then running through Instagram for the filters.  So the numbers could be higher for users who don’t do this.

By no way a scientific research, but enough to warrant pushing ahead building more code samples and prototypes at CityGrid and Hyp3rL0cal, so developers can pull high quality local photos from Instagram and include in their local web and mobile applications.